09 / 19 / 16

“History Is In Everything”

“History is in everything.” In many ways those are the words Gretchen Case has built her career on. Dr. Case is an assistant professor in medical humanities at the University of Utah School of Medicine where she deftly navigates intersections between the arts, humanities, and science—often using history as a vehicle. A small, but significant… Read more »

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07 / 25 / 16

Targeting Historical Federal Contracts: Research Strategies That Work

The federal government does much of its business through contracts. These documents define the relationship between the government and its contractors. Sometimes, years later, disputes arise involving the work performed under these agreements. Knowing the terms and context of these documents has helped our clients to resolve a variety of long-standing environmental, toxic tort, product… Read more »

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06 / 20 / 16

What’s Your Legacy? The Enduring Value of an Archive

Upon winning a championship or leaving office, sports figures and politicians are often asked to speculate about their legacy. Although leaving a legacy is something one may aspire to, it is really only something we see in retrospect. Such reflection requires perspective. Let me share a case in point in the context of History Associates’… Read more »

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06 / 24 / 15

Documenting Shock and Awe: Researching Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom

This post is featured on the History Associates timeline. It is ironic that our most recent military history is at risk of being lost. Changes in decades-old recordkeeping have created gaps in the historical record of 21st century military conflicts. This poses serious problems for policy makers, veterans, and our collective memory. However, utilizing creative… Read more »

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03 / 03 / 15

Mapping History: A Behind the Scenes Look at the Making of Historical Maps

On June 6, 1944, thousands of Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy in what would become a turning point of the Second World War. There are many ways to portray this pivotal moment, but eyewitness accounts, photographs, and artifacts only tell part of the story. Maps, however, can tie these pieces together, adding a… Read more »

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05 / 12 / 14

WWII and Korean War Industrial Mobilization: History Programs and Related Records

This is a modified version of a presentation I did for the 2014 Society for History in the Federal Government conference in April. This version focuses on the legal usefulness, in environmental cases, of the official agency histories and records concerning U.S. industrial mobilization for war and defense during World War II, the Korean War,… Read more »

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02 / 07 / 14

The Story of the Real Monuments Men Continues

At the end of January my wife and I enjoyed the privilege of attending an advance screening of The Monuments Men at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The movie tells an important and poignant story in an engaging manner while communicating significant elements with historical authenticity and nuance. Enhancing the cinematic experience was a… Read more »

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09 / 23 / 13

Notes from the Field: The Art of Crafting a FOIA Request

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is yet more proof of the adage “no good deed goes unpunished.” Though intended to facilitate greater transparency in government, as those who have submitted a FOIA request can attest, the process can be maddeningly opaque. Enacted in 1966, FOIA (5 U.S.C. § 552) established the public’s statutory right… Read more »

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09 / 21 / 12

Time and Space: Interpreting History through GIS Mapping

GIS mapping is a powerful way to make history come to life. Combining geographic information system (GIS) data with historical information, may serve to: Present historical evidence in its precise geographical context, Visually convey geographic changes over time, or Tell engaging stories from a geohistorical perspective. Visually illustrating change over time in this way is… Read more »

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03 / 19 / 12

Is Google Making You Fat? Tips for Conducting “Lean and Mean” On-line Historical Research

The amount of on-line content continues to grow exponentially, making the Internet an indispensable tool in historical research. Clay Johnson, on-line database expert and author of the cleverly written book The Information Diet, contends that with so much readily available on-line data, it is critical to make informed choices, maintaining a “healthy diet” of information… Read more »

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