09 / 05 / 19

What’s in a Name? How Place Names Reveal Our History

Builders have always laid claim to historical memory. Early settlers adopted variations of names coined by Native Americans; later generations took on the names of disappearing farms, fields, and mills. More recently, real estate developers have learned that place names are just a beginning—that yesterday’s authentic stories can add value to today’s communities. Take Clarksburg,… Read more »

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05 / 13 / 19

Shedding Light on Tourism History: Tiki Bars

Historians researching restaurant reviews from the 1950s? You’d be surprised where history takes us! Especially for topics like the fascinating tourism history of tiki bars. The history of tourism is often overlooked, and can be difficult to study because collections and research are not generally directed to preserving restaurant menus, brochures, or other ephemera that… Read more »

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02 / 11 / 19

Unfreezing 1923: How the Reopening of the Public Domain Opens Doors for Museums

After a 20-year freeze, a flood of new content is now available in the public domain: iconic films like Charlie Chaplin’s The Pilgrim, riveting reads by Willa Cather and H.G. Wells, remarkable works by M.C. Escher and Henri Matisse, and much more. The public domain has remained frozen in place since 1998. That year, Congress… Read more »

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04 / 05 / 18

A Historic Presidents Race

Major league baseball is a sport steeped in history, tradition, and statistics. With the start of the 2018 baseball season officially underway we thought it would be fun to examine one of the traditions of our local MLB team, the Washington Nationals — the Presidents race. Most major league teams try to keep their crowds… Read more »

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09 / 19 / 16

“History Is In Everything”

“History is in everything.” In many ways those are the words Gretchen Case has built her career on. Dr. Case is an assistant professor in medical humanities at the University of Utah School of Medicine where she deftly navigates intersections between the arts, humanities, and science—often using history as a vehicle. A small, but significant… Read more »

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07 / 25 / 16

Targeting Historical Federal Contracts: Research Strategies That Work

The federal government does much of its business through contracts. These documents define the relationship between the government and its contractors. Sometimes, years later, disputes arise involving the work performed under these agreements. Knowing the terms and context of these documents has helped our clients to resolve a variety of long-standing environmental, toxic tort, product… Read more »

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06 / 20 / 16

What’s Your Legacy? The Enduring Value of an Archive

Upon winning a championship or leaving office, sports figures and politicians are often asked to speculate about their legacy. Although leaving a legacy is something one may aspire to, it is really only something we see in retrospect. Such reflection requires perspective. Let me share a case in point in the context of History Associates’… Read more »

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06 / 24 / 15

Documenting Shock and Awe: Researching Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom

This post is featured on the History Associates timeline. It is ironic that our most recent military history is at risk of being lost. Changes in decades-old recordkeeping have created gaps in the historical record of 21st century military conflicts. This poses serious problems for policy makers, veterans, and our collective memory. However, utilizing creative… Read more »

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03 / 03 / 15

Mapping History: A Behind the Scenes Look at the Making of Historical Maps

On June 6, 1944, thousands of Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy in what would become a turning point of the Second World War. There are many ways to portray this pivotal moment, but eyewitness accounts, photographs, and artifacts only tell part of the story. Maps, however, can tie these pieces together, adding a… Read more »

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05 / 12 / 14

WWII and Korean War Industrial Mobilization: History Programs and Related Records

This is a modified version of a presentation I did for the 2014 Society for History in the Federal Government conference in April. This version focuses on the legal usefulness, in environmental cases, of the official agency histories and records concerning U.S. industrial mobilization for war and defense during World War II, the Korean War,… Read more »

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